I’m a loyal fan of Barbara O’Neal’s writing and her books. But this one was disappointing for me. There were way too many moving elements. It’s like the author had a bunch of post-it notes of ideas stuck to the wall and tried to combine them all into one book.

Let’s not get me started on the overuse of adjectives, as well. I believe the author has the intent of making books beautiful. Beautifully written. But there is such a thing as being overly done and using too many ingredients. To the point where you wreck it.

This book had immense potential to be incredible. If you read it front to back, you’ll note that there’s not even that much plot, sex scenes woven in that seem to contradict the author’s own advice (referencing a writing how-to book by Barbara Samuel), and lackluster storytelling. If this is the direction the author is going with her work, I’m going to have to bow out. Her earlier work was much better. Sometimes less is more.

When We Believed in Mermaids Blurb:

Her sister has been dead for fifteen years when she sees her on the TV news…

Josie Bianci was killed years ago on a train during a terrorist attack. Gone forever. It’s what her sister, Kit, an ER doctor in Santa Cruz, has always believed. Yet all it takes is a few heart-wrenching seconds to upend Kit’s world. Live coverage of a club fire in Auckland has captured the image of a woman stumbling through the smoke and debris. Her resemblance to Josie is unbelievable. And unmistakable. With it comes a flood of emotions—grief, loss, and anger—that Kit finally has a chance to put to rest: by finding the sister who’s been living a lie.

After arriving in New Zealand, Kit begins her journey with the memories of the past: of days spent on the beach with Josie. Of a lost teenage boy who’d become part of their family. And of a trauma that has haunted Kit and Josie their entire lives.

Now, if two sisters are to reunite, it can only be by unearthing long-buried secrets and facing a devastating truth that has kept them apart far too long. To regain their relationship, they may have to lose everything.

Author Sonya Larson Plagiarized

Plagiarism is like a bell that once rung, it cannot be unheard. Author Sonya Larson rang that bell with glee, spite, hatred, and a sincerely

City of Girls – Elizabeth Gilbert

“Life is both fleeting and dangerous, and there is no point in denying yourself pleasure, or being anything other than what you are.”